Battalion Chronology

 

Date (From)

To

Location

Activity

1932

 

Southeastern US

Army reorganized forces in continental US, to divide them into 4 sections, with one army per section. 3rd Army located in Southeast section with headquarters alternating between Atlanta, GA and Fort Sam Houston, TX.

 

 

 

 

6/-/40

 

Fort Bragg NC

The 79th Field Artillery Battalion is the first 240mm howitzer battalion formed.

 

 

 

 

1/25/43

 

 

Constituted in the Army of the United States as the 267th Field Artillery Battalion

 

 

 

 

3/1/43

 

Camp Shelby MS

267th Field Artillery Battalion activated as part of the 3rd Army to fire 105mm Howitzers (Truck drawn and nondivisional).  Officers were Reservists called to Active Duty and recent graduates of the Field Artillery Officer Candidate School, Ft Sill OK, and the enlisted members were almost entirely from personnel called to active duty with the Georgia National Guard and transferred from the 179th FA Group Camp Shelby.  The Field Artillery Replacement Training Centers at Fort Bragg and Fort Sill furnished the majority of filler enlisted.  Most of them were draftees.  The enlisted medical detachment were from the 78th Infantry Division, Camp Butler NC.  Lt Col Walter Hinsch CO.  Battalion was attached to the 403rd FA Group

 

 

 

 

3/1/43

12/24/43

Camp Shelby MS

The 267th FAB was billeted and trained in the area of 38th to 42nd Streets and 9th to 15th Avenues. In 2017 the site where 267 FAB was quartered is fields and a tank wash area.

 

 

 

 

4/27/43

 

Camp Shelby MS

267th FAB proceeded with training as outlined in Unit Training Programs for Field Artillery but was somewhat hampered by lack of equipment.  Completed Physical Fitness Test with a 93% score

 

 

 

 

5/1/43

 

 

267 FAB completed Individual Training with a satisfactory score in May

 

 

 

 

8/13/43

 

Camp Shelby MS

267 FAB completed Battery Test I with 89% and Battery Test II with a 84% score

 

 

 

 

9/15/43

9/19/43

Camp Shelby MS

267 FAB completed unit training program with completion of Battalion Test III.  Battalion Test I on 9/15 with 68%, Battalion Test II on 9/17 with 85% and Battalion Test III with 81%

 

 

 

 

9/23/43

 

 

85 enlisted personnel transferred from 267 FAB to the 65th Infantry Division

 

 

 

 

9/24/43

 

 

267 FAB departed Camp Shelby to participate in Louisiana Army maneuvers.  Battalion left Camp Shelby at 0630 and marched to U.S. Army Recreation Area, Natchez MS arriving at 1500, a distance of 165 miles.  The weather was fair and the roads good

 

 

 

 

9/25/43

 

 

267th FAB left Natchez at 0730 and marched to a bivouac area in vicinity of Zimmerman LA arriving at 1430, a distance of 133 miles.  The roads were good and the weather fair.  

 

 

 

 

9/25/43

11/1/43

Leesville LA

267 FAB participates in Fourth Period 1943 Third Army maneuvers. 

 

 

 

 

11/1/43

 

 

267th FAB left bivouac area six miles north of Leesville (Fort Polk) for Camp Van Dorn at 0715 arriving at 1800 having covered a distance of 209 miles over good roads in fair weather 

 

 

 

 

11/1/43

11/17/43

Camp Van Dorn MS

Temporary change of station.  Participated in  Combined training with the 364th Infantry, an all-black unit

 

 

 

 

11/15/43

 

 

Col Hinsch was killed and 2 other officers wounded by a short round from an 81mm mortar.  

 

 

 

 

11/17/43

 

 

267 FAB left Camp Van Dorn and completed march to Camp Shelby, a distance of 148 miles.  Battalion departed at 0700 and arrived at 1215.  The roads were good and weather fair but cold

 

 

 

 

11/17/43

12/24/43

Camp Shelby MS

267th FAB conducted post maneuver training

 

 

 

 

11/23/43

 

Fort Bragg NC

The 697th FAB (successor to the 79th FAB) responding to an urgent request by General Marshall for heavy artillery in the Italian Theater, is the first 240mm FAB alerted for overseas duty.

 

 

 

 

12/11/43

 

 

267 FAB completed Air Ground Test with 93%

 

 

 

 

12/14/43

 

 

Major William B Collins assumes command and will command the 267th FAB throughout the war.

 

 

 

 

12/24/43

4/22/44

Fort Bragg NC 

267 FAB transferred to Fort Bragg NC.  Departed Camp Shelby on 12/24 arriving Fort Bragg on 12/26.  Relieved of assignment to 3rd Army and attachment to XIX Corps and 403 FA Group and assigned to 2nd Army, XII Corps and 402nd FA Group

 

 

 

 

1/1/44

 

 

267th FAB, Battery C, 2nd Gun Section, 19 Personnel: SGT William F Potter, Atlanta GA; Sgt Everett L Walker, Sacramento CA; Sgt Henry A Jones, Hemlock, NC; Sgt Herbert C Myers, Wise VA; Cpl Elmer L Toth, Cleveland OH; Monroe Bailey, Monroe WV; Austin Bishop, Cincinnati Oh;  Frank A Percival, Ravena NY; John C Johnston, Corning NY; Rogelio Herrera, Mission TX; Richmond Howse, Atlanta GA; George I Basher, Cavalier ND; James F Janhke, Marshfield WI; John D Mussey, Salisbury NH; Oliver W Privett, Swayer KY; Charles Asztalos, Garfield NJ

 

 

 

 

1/1/44

 

 

3rd Army is alerted to deploy to European Theater of Operations

 

 

 

 

1/1/44

2/13/44

 

267th FAB converts from 105mm Howitzers  to 240mm Howitzers (M1918M1A1 Modified Tractor Drawn for training purposes) and conducts training on new material.  It is then issued 240mm M1 Howitzers which are deployed with the Battalion. Enlisted personnel were sent to Tractor School at Fort Sill OK and Tank Drivers School at Fort Knox KY.  The 240mm howitzer fires a 360 lb. shell a maximum range of 14.3 miles.

 

 

 

 

1/30/44

 

Milano Italy

The 697th FAB fires the first 240mm round of World War II

 

 

 

 

2/13/44

4/22/44

 

Intensive training preparatory to movement overseas when the 267th FAB departed for NY Port of Embarkation

 

 

 

 

3/9/44

 

 

Hygiene and Sexual Conduct Training

 

 

 

 

3/11/44

 

 

Malaria Control Training

 

 

 

 

3/14/44

 

 

Articles of War Training

 

 

 

 

3/31/44

 

 

267th FAB completed Battalion Test II with a score of 80%.  Battalion received movement orders for overseas shipment (Shipment No 4945-C)

 

 

 

 

4/5/44

 

 

267th FAB completed a modified Battalion Test III with an excellent rating

 

 

 

 

4/22/44

 

 

267th FAB ships out by rail from Fort Bragg and arrives at Fort Slocum outside New Rochelle NY the following day

 

 

 

 

4/23/44

5/5/44

Fort Slocum NY

267 FAB was staging for deployment at Fort Slocum, NY, Fort Dix, NJ and Camp Kilmer, NJ

 

 

 

 

5/5/44

 

 

267th FAB moved by rail from Fort Slocum to Fort Dix.  Arrived the same day

 

 

 

 

5/5/44

6/26/44

Fort Dix NJ

267th FAB resumed intensive training for deployment overseas

 

 

 

 

5/8/44

 

 

Vaccinations

 

 

 

 

6/2/44

 

 

Vaccinations

 

 

 

 

5/8/44

7/30/44

England

267th Field Artillery Battalion Advanced Detachment was in Llanover, Monmouthshire (Cheshire county) around 5/8/44.  On 6/7/44 it was located at coordinates VP 2394, Peover England and moved to Cornwall in July 44

 

 

 

 

6/26/44

 

 

267th FAB departs Fort Dix by rail and arrives Camp Kilmer NJ the same day

 

 

 

 

6/26/44

7/22/44

Camp Kilmer NJ

267th FAB at Camp Kilmer NJ awaiting transportation overseas

 

 

 

 

7/22/44

 

 

267th FAB departs Camp Kilmer on the ferry SS NY 22 up the Hudson River for the Queen Mary in New York harbor.  Board the ship

 

 

 

 

7/23/44

 

New York City

Departed NYPE for European Theater of Operation aboard the SS Queen Mary at 0700

 

 

 

 

7/23/44

7/28/44

 

Queen Mary Wartime Cruise WW #38E with 12,009 troops and 1,130 crew sailed under the command of Captain Bisset from NYC to Greenock Scotland (outside of Glasgow).  It traveled 3,315 miles at an average speed of 28.02 knots.  Crossing took 4 days, 22 hours and 18 minutes. 

 

 

 

 

7/28/44

 

England

General Patton assumes operational control of 3rd Army

 

 

 

 

7/28/44

7/29/44

Greenock Scotland

Arrived from NY to Greenock Scotland, just outside Glasgow 

 

 

 

 

7/29/44

 

 

Departed Greenock for duty in Bude Cornwall England

 

 

 

 

7/30/44

8/28/44

Bude Cornwall England

Moved into temporary quarters awaiting movement to ETO  New Address:  267 FAB, APO 403 US Army

 

 

 

 

8/1/44

 

 

267th FAB alerted for movement to ETO.  3rd Army becomes operational in France at 1200 hours in France.

 

 

 

 

8/1/44

8/28/44

 

267th FAB re-equipped, having  moved overseas with only individual equipment, howitzers and prime movers.  The 267th FAB completes preparation for movement to the Continent.  3rd Army track equipment for 155mm , 5 inch howitzer, 8 inch gun and 240mm howitzer battalions were unloaded at Liverpool, Manchester and Glasgow, often as much as 300 miles from the unit's station.  Such equipment were not capable of moving long distances on hard surface roads because of excess wear of the tracks and hogies resulted.  The Transportation Corps was able to move some of the smaller of this equipment by rail.  Most of this equipment was too high and too wide for rail movement.  Two ordnance evacuation battalions, equipped with tank transporters, moved the equipment to units including the 267th FAB.  Artillery ranges were established in southern England and Wales.  Training emphasized coordinating fire on targets by multiple battalions, including those with different caliber cannons.  

 

 

 

 

8/14/44

 

 

There were 61 3rd Army units in the United Kingdom which were not completely equipped. 

 

 

 

 

8/15/44

 

 

Allied Supreme Headquarters officially announced for worldwide dissemination that 3rd Army was operational on the Continent under the command of Lieutenant General George S. Patton Jr. 

 

 

 

 

8/28/44

8/30/44

 

267th FAB transits from Bude Cornwall to Pidolehinton Dorset.  

 

 

 

 

8/28/44

 

Okehampton England

267th FAB enroute to concentration area, marched to bivouac area one mile west of Okehampton, Cornwall England, a distance of 32 miles.  The weather was fair and the roads were good.

 

 

 

 

8/29/44

 

Honiton England

267th FAB left Okehampton, marched to bivouac area at Honiton, Devonshire England, a distance of 38 miles.  The weather was fair and the roads were good.

 

 

 

 

8/30/44

 

Pidolehinton Dorset England

267th FAB left Honiton and arrived at concentration area, Pidolehinton, a distance of 43 miles.  The weather was fair and the roads good.  12th U.S. Army Group notified 3rd Army that there would be no gasoline available in appreciable amounts until 9/3. 

 

 

 

 

8/31/44

 

France

 All 3rd Army supply points were dry and unit loads were fast disappearing.  In August 3rd Army: captured 35,000 square miles of territory and 66 towns from the German Army; and lost 82 artillery pieces (over 75mm) in combat, while the German Army lost 1080.  

 

 

 

 

8/31/44

9/1/44

Weymouth England

267th FAB moved to marshalling area at Weymouth for transit to ETO.  Distance of 6 miles.  The roads were good and the weather was cold and raining.  Battalion boards LST's and LCT's  for shipment to France.  Boarded LST B1365.  Confronted with the necessity of attaching units to Prisoner of War escort duty, the 3rd Army initially assigned incoming units to this duty.  These units were quickly relieved and made available for combat by the assignment to POW duty, including three artillery battalions in August, who were awaiting their basic weapons in the United Kingdom and who were brought to the ETO for this purpose.  The 734th FAB was one of those units and would serve with the 267th performing POW and rear area security in 45.

 

 

 

 

9/1/44

9/30/44

France

The 267th was integrated into a very different war plan for the 3rd Army than the one that existed during the first 31 days of European action.   The breakout from Normandy and the fast pace of the Army's August advance was slowed, requiring General Patton to greatly revise his plan of attack.  As the 267th arrived on the shores of France, an acute shortage of gasoline was seriously impairing the 3rd Army's mobility.  Subsequently, came other supply shortages, including artillery ammunition, plus an enemy buildup and steadily worsening weather conditions.  By late September, 3rd Army had gone from an offensive to a defensive status, allowing the Wehrmacht to turn around at the German border and fortify the Moselle river line.  There the enemy fought desperately to prevent crossings of the Moselle and Meurthe Rivers with intense counterattacks.  It built hastily-assembled units, made up of stragglers, untrained recruits, some convalescents and students from an Officer Candidate School at Metz, that were thrown into the line in an effort to stabilize the front.  All along the front, the enemy rushed the preparation for hasty field fortifications, especially along the east bank of the Moselle River.  In addition, forced civilian labor, Hitler Youth organizations and newly formed Army units frantically repaired and strengthened the defensive works of the Siegfried Line, and constructed successive lines of defense between Moselle and the German border.  By the end of September, the 3rd Army tank-infantry-air assaults, aided by the most intensive use of artillery thus far in the campaign, had pushed the enemy successively across the Moselle, Meurthe and Vezouse Rivers and into the Forêt  De Parroy, where the enemy stubbornly  resisted.  The bulk of the Wehrmacht’s armored and infantry divisions committed in September were hastily organized.  While their equipment was new, troops only had two or three weeks training.  Panzer brigades were ultimately ineffective and suffered heavy losses.  During the battle to cross the Moselle River, terrific tank battles raged all along the bridgehead.  3rd Army artillery came into its own in the attacks on the Metz defenses.  The enemy use of the many forts, both old and modernized, presented the most difficult artillery problem.  Even the 240mm guns proved incapable of destroying these fortifications.  However, the fullest exploitation of artillery was prevented by prolonged scarcity of ammunition.  The German artillery was effective against the attackers but suffered from a high proportion of duds.  Enemy air activity was curtailed sharply in the 3rd Army zone.  Only 128 raids by 287 aircraft were made in September compared to August's total of 1,117 raids by 3,213 aircraft.  Anti-aircraft artillery claimed twenty-eight planes destroyed and fifteen probable destroyed.  German casualties were estimated at 32,000 killed, 96,500 wounded and nearly 30,000 captured.  3rd Army captured or destroyed 607 enemy tanks, 663 artillery pieces and 1,735 vehicles.  Allied casualties for the month were 2,130 killed, 12,307 wounded, 4,100 missing and 390 deserted.  

 

 

 

 

9/1/44

9/4/44

Utah Beach France

267 FAB departed Weymouth on LST's and LCT's and crossed English Channel to Utah Beach in France.  Part of the Battalion arrived the same day, debarking at Utah Beach on 9/2.  Bivouacked at Assembly Area B.  Those loaded on LCT's were either kept in port or forced back to Weymouth England because of a channel storm rough water.  Those who return to England were delayed until 9/4, when the entire unit was on Utah Beach.

 

 

 

 

9/2/44

 

Utah Beach France

Arrived in Normandy France for Duty; Served in: Cherbourg, Paris, Lunéville, Nancy.  Pursuant to 3rd Army Directive dated 9/2/44, XV Corps (79th Infantry Division, 83rd Infantry Division, 2nd French Armored Division, and supporting troops) will, without delay to take up positions and seize a line of the Moselle River within its zone and be prepared to advance to the northeast to seize Karlsruhe and secure a bridgehead east of the Rhine river within zone or move through bridgeheads secured by XII or XX Corps.  Of 3rd Army artillery units newly arriving on the Continent, one 240mm Howitzer battalion was attached to 33rd Field Artillery Brigade, one 4.5 inch Gun battalion to XV Corps and one towed tank destroyer battalion to XX Corps.   

 

 

 

 

9/3/44

 

France

267th FAB remained near Sainte-Mere-Eglese until the remainder of the Battalion arrived from the United Kingdom.     Shortage of gasoline gripped the entire 3rd Army with the result that all field artillery units were almost completely immobilized.  Movement was restricted in the XII and XV Corps zones.  Woolen clothing and blankets were in critically short supply.  

 

 

 

 

9/5/44

 

St Mars France

The 267th FAB and another newly arrived 240mm Howitzer battalion were available for assignment to 3rd Army.  Gasoline supplies increased allowing the 267th FAB to depart Assembly Area B, 3rd U.S. Army Assembly Area outside Sainte-Mere-Eglese for Sens France and arrived the same day at bivouac area at Saint-Mars-d'Égrenne, France, distance of 101 miles.  The weather was fair and roads good.    The 3rd Army resumed its advance to the east toward the heavily fortified cities of Metz and Nancy in Alsace-Lorraine with the enemy offering strong resistance.  

 

 

 

 

9/6/44

 

Cloyes France

267th FAB left Saint-Mars-d'Égrenne and arrived at bivouac area Cloyes-sur-le-Loir, France for a distance of 133 miles.  The weather was fair and the roads good.  XII Corps liberated Pont-a-Mousson.  Corps Artillery supported the both the 318th Infantry with a mission to cross the Moselle and clear the way for CCA, 4th Armored Division to advance on Nancy from the northeast and the 319th Infantry with a mission to cross the Moselle and advance on Nancy from the west.  Corps artillery completed the mission despite shortages of ammunition and fuses.  

 

 

 

 

9/7/44

 

Sens France

267th FAB left Cloyes-sur-le-Loir and arrived at bivouac area at Sens, a distance of 117 miles.  The weather was fair and the roads good.  While at 3rd Army concentration area, 9/7  267 FAB is attached to XII Corps and one incoming field artillery group was attached to XX Corps. Despite inclement weather, XII Corps pushed forward to attack Lunéville.  Ammunition supply points in support of XII Corps was virtually devoid of all types of artillery ammunition and fuses.  Throughout September 3rd Army and the 267th operations would be limited by shortages of fuel and artillery ammunition.   

 

 

 

 

9/8/44

9/10/44

St Dizier France

267th FAB Commander received orders from XII Corps attaching Battalion to 410 FA Group and move to vicinity of Moutrot France.  While enroute to Moutrot, 267 FAB received new orders to detach from XII Corps and the 410 FA Group, and attach to XV Corps and the 144th FA Group.  Battalion then rerouted and ordered to bivouac in St. Dizier France.  Bivouacked at St Dizier, a distance of 152 miles.  The weather was fair and the roads good.  XV Corps was ordered to the Lorraine area and transferred to General Patton’s command.  

 

 

 

 

9/8/44

 

 

3rd Army experienced strong resistance along the entire Moselle front from Metz to Nancy.  It was also experiencing a shortage of M-4 tractors and trucks.  Two 155mm Gun battalions, both waiting receipt of their primary weapons from the U.S., and one towed tank destroyer battalion were presently assigned to Prisoner of War guard duty.  XV Corps Artillery was moving forward into an assembly area on the south flank of the 3rd Army, which lacked any 240mm battalions.  

 

 

 

 

9/10/44

 

 

Two tank destroyer battalions arrived on the Continent, thereby completing the lift of all field artillery and tank destroyer units with the 3rd Army.  Pursuant to a Memorandum dated today, XV Corps is directed by General Patton to move, without delay, to seize and secure bridgehead east of Moselle River and leave behind only the minimal force necessary to cover south flank from Mortargis to Chaumont.  One 155mm Gun battalion and one 8-inch Howitzer battalion were detached from XX Corps and one 240mm Howitzer battalion (267th FAB) was detached from XII Corps, all being attached to XV Corps in support of this operation.  Upon receipt of orders, XV Corps launches an attack to secure the west bank of the Moselle River in the vicinity of Charmes and Kpinal.  

 

 

 

 

9/11/44

 

St. Dizier France

267th FAB Commander and party left on reconnaissance for position in vicinity of Diarville.  Battalion left St Dizier enroute to firing position.  Arrived at Diarville, a distance of 132 miles and emplaced howitzers in position.  The weather was fair and roads fair.  The 3rd Army ammunition situation continued to be critical.  Air Op patrols proved effective in minimizing enemy artillery fire, it being found that enemy artillery, to avoid disclosing their positions, would not fire when our planes were in the air.  XV Corps continues drive to cross the Moselle River 

 

 

 

 

9/12/44

9/19/44

Diarville France

267th FAB establishes first firing positions near Diarville France.  Battalion engaged in harassing and interdictory fires in support of XV Corps.  The Battalion supported the XV Corps which displaced forward to vicinity of Landécourt.  Forward observation conducted by Battalion's light aircraft with First LT James Pollard as the Air Observer with First LTs George Lawrence and Hunter Harbinson rotating as pilot. 

 

 

 

 

9/12/44

 

 

XV Corps crosses the Moselle River.  Its 79th Infantry fights forward with the 313th Infantry reaching Mirecourt and the 314th Infantry occupying Neufchateau. It also occupies Charmes on the Moselle.  Some enemy artillery was received, mostly interdiction fires on the roads and shells from individual guns directed at our OPs.  One liaison plane was destroyed on its landing strip by artillery fire from an enemy battery on the south flank that had been bypassed in the Corps' advance.  

 

 

 

 

9/13/44

 

 

The 79th Infantry Division of XV Corps captured Bettencourt.   The French 2nd Armored Division, assigned to the XV Corps, destroyed a German Panzer brigade in the town of Dompaire. Due to critical shortages of Class I supplies, the 3rd Army HQ began issuing German rations, numerous captured storehouses being emptied, and field bakeries began to use captured German flour.  Critical shortages of gasoline continues.  

 

 

 

 

9/14/44

 

 

XV Corps continues its advance east.  The 79th Infantry Division moved forward with its 315th Infantry capturing the city of Chatenois and advancing to the area from Neuviller-sur-Moselle to Sous.  The 313th captured Remecourt.  A sound and flash detachment of the 14th Field Artillery Observation Battalion was overrun and fought as infantry for six hours until relieved

 

 

 

 

9/15/44

 

 

XV Corps was employing one heavy antiaircraft artillery battalion in a field artillery role.  Two severe counterattacks by infantry and tanks against the 2nd French Armored Division at Chatel-Sur-Moselle were supported by heavy enemy artillery fire.  Both counterattacks were repelled, one being broken up by the artillery fire of the 2nd French Armored Division Artillery.  14 German tanks were destroyed or disabled by Division artillery fire.  The important boarder city of Nancy was captured.  At Vittel 2,087 Allied Nationals, who were interned for 4 years in hotels surrounded by wire barricades were repatriated.  Included were 361 US, 1,160 British and the remainder from 29 other nationalities.  

 

 

 

 

9/16/44

 

 

XV Corps directed by General Patton in Amendment No. 2 to Operational Directive this date to seize Maucheim and secure a bridgehead east of the Rhine River or move through bridgehead secured by XII Corps or XX Corps.  Hundreds of civilian refugees were moving along roads.

 

 

 

 

9/17/44

 

 

52 240mm rounds were expended over past 7 days by XV Corps.

 

 

 

 

9/18/44

 

 

267th FAB Battalion Commander and party left on reconnaissance for position in vicinity of Froville and Landécourt France.  XV Corps launched an attack with the 79th succeeding in driving completely across the Moselle River in the vicinity of Bayon.  The 313, 314 and 315 Infantries advanced to Gerberviller

 

 

 

 

9/19/44

9/24/44

Landécourt France

267th FAB left Diarville on 9/19 and arrived at Landécourt, distance of 9 miles.  The weather was rainy and roads good.  Fired interdiction and harassing fires in the vicinity of Landécourt in support of XV Corps and displaced forward to vicinity of Lunéville and Hériménil.  The 267th along with another battalion were emplaced east of the Moselle River to fire in close support of the Division.  After a bitter firefight,  the 313th Infantry Regiment captures the town of Xermaménil

 

 

 

 

9/19/44

 

 

XV Corps elements began to cross the Montagne River.  In efforts to delay the advance, the enemy blew bridges, constructed roadblocks of mines and felled trees, and built trenches, bunkers and antitank positions.  Gasoline supplies become critical again.  

 

 

 

 

9/20/44

 

 

3rd Army Intelligence estimates the Germans have massed 63,750 troops with 175 tanks or assault guns with another 42,000 troops and 150 tanks in immediate reserves against XV Corps.  

 

 

 

 

9/22/44

 

 

After several days of battle, XV Corps liberated Lunéville and is ordered to attack the thickly wooded Forêt  de Parroy

 

 

 

 

9/23/44

 

 

267th FAB Battery A displaced forward to positions in vicinity of Hériménil while remainder of Battalion remained in position.  The 267th fired reinforcing the 2nd French Armored Division.

 

 

 

 

9/24/44

10/14/44

Lunéville/Hériménil  France

Remainder of the 267th FAB displaced to Hériménil /Lunéville vicinity.  Battalion fired harassing and interdiction fires in support of XV Corps from this position.  While in Lunéville, the Battalion attached to the 7th Army on 10/3  

 

 

 

 

9/24/44

 

 

3rd Army patrols probe the outlying defenses of the Siegfried Line and met with strong enemy resistance from pillboxes and other types of strongholds.  XV Corps continued aggressive patrolling beyond Lunéville and Badonviller. A strong enemy counterattack was launched against the 4th Armored Division.  It was broken up and repelled by artillery fire coordinated with aerial attack.  171 240mm rounds were expended over past 7  days by XV Corps.

 

 

 

 

9/25/44

 

 

Letter of Instruction No 4 by the Army Commander directs 3rd Army and 9th Army to assume defensive positions because of the acute supply situation.  Fuel and supplies will be conserved.   Bad weather grounded air support.  XV Corps continued aggressive patrolling and met stiff enemy resistance and increased enemy artillery.  Heavy artillery fire was encountered in the XV Corps area at Flin.  The engineers on the bridge at Flin were forced to withdraw their equipment while the Corps artillery fired a total of 23 counterbattery missions, causing considerable reduction of the enemy's artillery fire.  

 

 

 

 

9/26/44

 

 

XV Corps prepared to launch an attack with air to clear Poret De Parroy 4 miles east of Lunéville, where patrols were meeting strong resistance.  XV Corps experienced a sharp decline in enemy artillery activity.  The Corps Artillery fired 244 missions, almost entirely of a harassing or interdiction nature and of which all but 9 were unobserved.   The counterbattery missions were fired on a total of six active enemy locations.   

 

 

 

 

9/27/44

 

 

XV Corps, together with the 79th Infantry and the 2nd French Armored Divisions and all attached artillery units, including the 267th FAB was relieved of attachment to the 3rd Army and assigned to the 6th Army Group. 

 

 

 

 

9/28/44

 

 

XV Corps launches attack against Forêt  de Parroy.  XV Corps formally comes under control of 7th Army.  

 

 

 

 

10/1/44

10/31/44

 

3rd Army activities concentrated on building up supplies, the assembly and regrouping of troops, and laying plans for a new major offensive designed to drive the enemy back behind the Rhine River.  Troops were equipped with wet and cold weather clothing.  During October even the heaviest guns of 240mm proved relatively ineffectual against the forts in the vicinity of Metz.  Temporary neutralization of German guns being the most that could be achieved.  This month saw 3rd Army lose 5 artillery pieces over 75mm and the Germans losing 28.  27 Luftwaffe planes were shot down or probably destroyed.  

 

 

 

 

10/1/44

 

 

226 240mm rounds were expended over past 7 days by XV Corps.  To assure that front line troops would not be deprived of tobacco and reduce morale, steps were taken to speed up the delivery of a ten day requirement of tobacco components.  

 

 

 

 

10/3/44

 

Forêt  de Mondon France

267th FAB Battery C displaced forward to positions in Forêt  de Mondon in vicinity of Moncel

 

 

 

 

10/5/44

 

 

3rd Army Rear Echelon Headquarters for moved to Nancy.  It occupied one of 3 casernes (large groups of stone barracks) named Caserne Landremont.  Caserne Blandan and Caserne Molitor were used by other headquarters units.  They were originally built and occupied by the French Regular Army.  German troops had occupied them since 1940.  Troops were quartered in buildings around the casernes.  

 

 

 

 

10/10/44

 

 

XV corps clears the Forêt de Parroy in Lorraine against determined German resistance. 

 

 

 

 

10/11/44

10/23/44

 

XV Corps fought to capture the hill mass east of the Forêt de Parroy

 

 

 

 

10/12/44

 

Forêt  de Mondon France

267th FAB Battery A displaced forward to positions in Forêt  de Mondon in vicinity of Moncel.  General Patton in an Operational Directive ordered 3rd Army to move into a defensive posture to prepare for an upcoming offensive.  He directed that troops be rested, trained and maintenance be done on equipment.   This while building up supplies for the upcoming offensive.  He also directed aggressive patrolling to and coverage of all avenues of tank approach.  Extensive use was made of captured artillery pieces and ammunition, including Russian 76.2mm guns, German 88mm, 105mm Howitzers, 150mm guns and Schneider 155 Howitzers.  Ammunition for the Schneider Howitzer was employed successfully in the 155mm M-1 Howitzer.  Ground sheets and sleeping bags began to arrive but raincoats remain in short supply.  

 

 

 

 

10/14/44

 

Frambois/Gerbéviller France

267th FAB left and arrived at assembly area in vicinity of Garberville/Frambois.  267 FAB detached from 7th Army XV Corps, and the 144th FA Group and reverted to 3rd Army, attaching to 40 FA Group.  All artillery units, including the 267th ordered to restrict ammunition expenditures.  301 240mm rounds were expended over past 7 days by XII Corps. 

 

 

 

 

10/15/44

10/25/44

Foug France

267th FAB left Frambois/Gerbeville vicinity and arrived to bivouac at Foug, a distance of 50 miles.  The weather was fair and the roads good.  Battalion taken out of the front and ordered back to rest area.  The Battalion occupied rest area at Foug.  Period was spent in maintenance of clothing, equipment and material

 

 

 

 

10/17/44

 

 

267 FAB attached to 39th HQ and HQ Battery, 40th FA Group.  General Dwight Eisenhower and Lt General Jacob Devers visited 3rd Army Headquarters to review the plan for resumption of the offensive.  

 

 

 

 

10/18/44

 

 

3rd Army Memorandum this date entitled: Outline Plans for Resumption of the Offensive, General Patton describes plans for the Lorraine Campaign.  The plan is for 3rd Army to: Envelop Metz defensive works from the north and south; advance northeast to seize Mainz, Frankfurt and Darmstadt.  XII Corps (26th, 35th, and 80th Infantry Divisions along with the 4th and 6th Armored Divisions) would advance northeast from Pont-A-Mousson and seize rail and road facilities in the vicinity of Falkenberg; in conjunction with XX Corps, destroy enemy forces withdrawing from Metz; continue to advance northeast to establish a bridgehead east of the Rhine River between Oppenheim and Mannheim and seize Darmstadt.  

 

 

 

 

10/19/44

 

 

Articles of War Training.  The enemy continued to improve his positions by digging, mine laying and constructing fortifications in the XII Corps zone.

 

 

 

 

10/25/44

12/16/44

 

267 FAB detached from 40th FA Group and attached to XII Corps Artillery, 3rd Army.  The Battalion operated directly under the Corps Fire Direction Center without group attachment.  Code name for Battalion is "Lucid"

 

 

 

 

10/25/44

 

 

267th FAB Detached from 40th FA Group and attached to XII Corps. The 267th FAB and one armored field artillery battalion, both previously in a rest area to perform necessary maintenance of equipment, were attached to XII Corps.   Battalion Commander and party reconnoitered for positions in vicinity of Bratte.  Due to increasing shortages of critical supplies, many items of captured German ordnance were modified for use by 3rd Army .  Gasoline, tires, innertubes and patches were in short supply.  Gas rationing and conservation of supplies was in place.

 

 

 

 

10/26/44

 

Faulx/Bratte  France

267th FAB left Foug and arrives at Faulx, in the vicinity of Bratte France.  

 

 

 

 

10/26/44

11/8/44

Faulx/Bratte France

267th FAB available to support XII Corps. During the period 10/26 to 11/8 with the exception of registrations, no missions were fired.  This is due to strict rationing of field artillery ammunition.

 

 

 

 

10/27/44

 

 

267 FAB in ready position to support XII Corps

 

 

 

 

10/29/44

 

 

11 240mm rounds were expended over past 7 days by XII Corps. 

 

 

 

 

10/30/44

 

 

One platoon, Battery C, 243rd FAB, with an 8 inch howitzer, attached to 267th FAB.  Germans employ harassing mortar and artillery fire along 3rd Army front lines. 

 

 

 

 

11/1/44

11/30/44

 

The crushing offensive of 11/8-9 saw 3rd Army return to the attack.  Artillery with the  Army played  a major role as the 3rd Army broke out of its positions along the Moselle River and commenced its inexorable advance upon the Saar Basin.  The initial artillery preparation in support of XII Corps' attack was perhaps the most massive in the operational history of the 3rd Army to date.  42 artillery battalions, embracing some 540 guns, participated in these fires.  Bad weather and sudden floods critically endangered the attacking troops initially, notably the infantry elements of the 90th Infantry Division isolated east of the Moselle River in the Kornigsmacher bridgehead.  4 days elapsed before a bridge could be completed and tank destroyers moved across the river into the bridgehead.  The enemy utilized this period for repeatedly heavy tank and infantry counterattack against the bridgehead forces.  The tenacious defenders, heavily supported by the powerful close-in defensive fires of 20 artillery battalions, successfully repelled every threat.  The subsidence of the floods marked the end of the critical period.  By 11/19, the encirclement of the fortress city of Metz was completed and its final reduction in process.  Thenceforth the 3rd Army drove steadily toward the Saar River.  Despite harsh weather, poor observation and mud, artillery support of the advances was heavy and continuous, embracing scheduled and on call missions, observed and unobserved fires.  Especially heavy harassing and interdiction fires were fired at all times, most notably upon the escape routes as the encircling vise closed about Metz.  Trench foot would become a great problem for 3rd Army troops, incapacitating more soldiers than injuries.  Confronted with the problems ranging from extreme weather conditions to flooded streams and terrain, the 3rd Army would still drive the Germans into their homeland behind the Siegfried Line.  

 

 

 

 

11/1/44

 

 

 three hostile planes in area.  Battalion was registered by high burst in conjunction with the 14th FA Group Observation flash base.

 

 

 

 

11/2/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: None; time spent to improve gun position.  XX Corps, in its effort to minimize the effect of stringent ammunition restrictions, was employing 39 captured artillery pieces and ammunition for use by Corps artillery.  

 

 

 

 

11/3/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: harassing and interdiction fires fired by No 1 gun, Battery B at a crossroads. 

 

 

 

 

11/4/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: None

 

 

 

 

11/5/44

 

 

267th FAB observation plane was fired on by enemy antiaircraft.  Forward observer reported artillery smoke coming from ridge between Eply and Raucourt and also from Secourt.  In Memorandum this date entitled "Target Data," General Patton directs the 3rd Army attack will occur between 5 and 8 November, depending on the availability of air support.  Under no circumstances will the attack be delayed later than 11/8.  The code word to announce D Day is "Play Ball."  When this word is sent in a message it means that D Day will be the following day.  A top secret letter, "Target Data" covering air support and target data for the attack, was issued to corps commanders.  XII Corps is ordered to advance northeast to Falkenberg and destroy the forces withdrawing from Metz.  They were also to advance as rapidly as possible to the northeast and establish a bridgehead east of the Rhine River and seize Darmstadt area.  36 240mm rounds were expended over past 7 days by XII Corps. 

 

 

 

 

11/6/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: None.  German artillery fire increased with heavy concentrations in Gremecey and Bioncourt in the XII Corps area.  German squads sent out night patrols in an attempt to capture American prisoners.  Artillery ammunition again became available for expenditure in substantial quantities.  Artillery units along the entire front prepared and occupied new positions.   

 

 

 

 

11/7/44

 

 

2 enemy vehicles (1 2 1/2 ton truck) and 1 tank observed by Battery B observer in area of Nomony.  

 

 

 

 

11/8/44

11/12/44

Bratte France

From firing positions near Bratte France, the Battalion supported the XII Corps attack across the Seille River and the Delme Ridge.

 

 

 

 

11/8/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: Bat C fired 4 rounds into town of Luppy France, Battalion constant firing all day.  Fired on towns, heavy batteries, command posts, in zone of 80th and 35th Infantry Divisions.  At 0600, General Patton leads 3rd Army as it opens the Lorraine Campaign.  Without the benefit of preliminary aerial bombardment, in rain and with unprecedented flood conditions prevailing, the attack achieved tactical surprise.   Experiments were made with a new anti-concussion device for artillerymen.  Made of acrylic and plastic, and molded to fit the individual ear, the device afforded considerable relief from concussion, according to tests under fire.   XII Corps launches attack from west of Moncourt through Moncourt and Bezange-la-Petite in an advance toward the Rhine River. XII Corps Artillery began an intense coordinated bombardment from H-Hour minus 60 minutes to H-Hour +147 minutes.  After the first 1/2 hour, divisional artillery was released for "on call" missions and targets of opportunity in close support of divisions.  90 concentrations were fired on towns, 13 on defiles, 190 on enemy artillery locations, 40 on enemy command posts, 31 on enemy anti-aircraft artillery locations, 14 on assembly areas, 1 on a strongpoint and 1 on a farm building.  The heaviest was a 6 battalion, two volley concentration on the town of Oriocourt.  Upon completion of the prearranged program, Corps Artillery continued to maintain intense neutralization fires until 1200 hours, after which heavy fires were delivered on call.  This heavy artillery support prevented any aggressive enemy artillery reaction to the attack, only 15 reports of enemy shelling being received over the entire Corps front and all of these small concentrations of less than 20 rounds each.  Serious disruption of enemy's communications was achieved.  Since weather grounded air support, it was up to the artillery to support the assault.  

11/9/44

 

 

Friendly aircraft (P-51 USAAF) crashed vicinity Malleloy.  Body of pilot evacuated to Graves Registration Unit by Unit Graves Registration Officer.  267th FAB Service Battery placed guard on crashed aircraft.  Representative of USAAF relieved Service Battery guard; enemy retreating at Delme; Fired on towns crossroads and towns in zone of 80th and 35th Infantry Divisions.  XII Corps continues to make good progress with the 137th seizing the high ground east of Laneveville-en-Saulnois, capturing Delme.  XII Corps Artillery fired heavily on targets of opportunity throughout the entire day and instituted a program of intensive harassing and interdiction fires.  Firing program directed that shelling occurred over a 24 hours per day with intensification at night.  

 

 

 

 

11/10/44

 

 

267th FAB Commander and S-3 made reconnaissance for forward displacement in vicinity Chenicourt with fire possibilities to reach Lemud and Burlioncourt.  Adverse weather and flooding gripped the entire 3rd Army front.  Artillery throughout the Army area continued to displace forward.  After initially facing disorganized resistance, XII Corps experienced stiff resistance along its entire front The enemy delayed the advance by means of defended minefields, roadblocks, obstacles and demolitions.  The 6th Armored Division captured Buchy, Luppy, Bechy and Tragny.

 

 

 

 

11/11/44

 

 

267th FAB Commander and S-3 made reconnaissance for forward displacement in vicinity Fizieux, Liocourt, Delme and Puzieux.  Ordered at 2230 to occupy positions in vicinity of Puzieux.  Three rounds fired on town Bechy by attached 243rd FA platoon.   Battalion fired several volleys into town of Bois de Château-Bréhain.  High performance plane observer stated that German armored and infantry units withdrew in disorder after concentrations were laid down.  XII Corps 80th Infantry Division drove north to liberate Bacourt and Prevocourt.  These forces began to menace enemy forces defending the city of Metz from the rear.   6th Armored Division forces pushed bridges across the Nied Erse River.  Trenchfoot began to appear among 3rd Army casualties.  

 

 

 

 

11/12/44

 

 

0930 267th FAB displaced to vicinity of Puzieux, encountered difficulty due to muddy terrain and bad condition of roads. 1900 Arrived.  Fire Mission: Bat C fired rounds into town of Morhange, France.  Battalion CP located in Delme, Service Battery CP in Puzieux.  General Brown inspected Battery positions.  XII Corps was meeting stubborn resistance in Bazoncourt and along the road from Han-sur-Nied to Herny.  Floods continued to hamper bridging operations, a situation upon which the enemy capitalized by strong artillery firing into U.S. bridge sites.  Arty pilots advised XII Corps Artillery of a large enemy troop concentration in the northern portion of Bois De Chateau Salins.  8 inch guns, and 240mm howitzers fired into the area for 20 minutes following which the enemy armored and infantry elements fled in confusion.  3rd Army directed commanders to focus troops attention on trench foot preventive measures.  Trench foot was responsible for an increasing number of casualties.  Troops were instructed to massage their feet and keep them dry by changing into clean socks which were issued daily with rations.  

 

 

 

 

11/12/44

11/14/44

Delme France

267th FAB moved to position near Delme  France on 11/12.  From firing positions in the Delme/Chenois vicinity the Battalion supported the XII Corps attack through Delme.  

 

 

 

 

11/13/44

 

 

XII Corps continued its advance north after repulsing several German counterattacks.  It also experienced enemy delaying tactics by extensive minefields, roadblocks and obstacles, and increased artillery fire.  

 

 

 

 

11/14/44

 

 

267th FAB Commander and S-3 reconnoinoitered for forward positions in vicinity of Lesse.  Twelve rounds were fired in town of Morhange from 0830 to 0900.   The Battalion was ordered to a forward position of Vic Lesse at 1300.  XII Corps 35th Infantry Division and CCB, 6th Armored Division launched attack to secure Morhange.   The Attack was preceded by a thirty minute artillery preparation fired upon towns, assembly areas and enemy artillery locations by organic artillery of both divisions and six battalions of Corps Artillery, including the 267th.   All XII Corps Artillery except that supporting the 26th Infantry Division displaced forward during the day.  

 

 

 

 

11/14/44

11/19/44

Chenois France

267th FAB left Delme and arrived Chenois, distance 13 kilometers at 0300 on 11/15.  Battalion CP and all batteries located at Chenois.  

 

 

 

 

11/15/44

 

 

267th FAB, No missions fired.  Attached platoon Battery C 243rd FAB, ordered to displace to forward position vicinity Lesse France.  XII Corps experienced strong counterattacks and heavy artillery fire along its entire front.  One enemy artillery concentration upon the 4th Armored Division at Bourgaltorff was heaviest in this Division's experience to date upon the Continent.  The 134th Infantry cleared Morhange and Racrange.  

 

 

 

 

11/16/44

 

 

No missions fired.  Time spent improving positions.  XII Corps, as did most of 3rd Army, regrouped for further attacks to the east.  There were only minor advances along the Corps front.  

11/17/44

 

 

267th FAB fired several rounds expended to check registrations on large building.  Attached platoon registered by high burst adjustment flash base.  XII Corps Artillery estimated it was opposed by a total of 15 battalions of enemy artillery.  Six Corps artillery battalions displaced forward.  

 

 

 

 

11/18/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: Rounds on Faulquemont, Lelling, Virming, Font Pierre, Hammering, Maxstedt, St. Avold and Puttelange by Battalion and attached platoon.  Fired antiaircraft on enemy high performance aircraft; Bat C fired rounds into towns of Gros Tenquien, Berteing, Bistroff and Lanning France.  Adjustment made by high performance plane on four railroad guns was made by Battalion.  One direct hit was reported.  Heavy enemy activity in St Avold was harassed by fire from the Battalion.  XV Corps experienced adverse weather conditions including heavy rains, poor visibility and high winds as it continued to drive German forces back toward the Siegfried Line.  Adverse weather was seriously hampering the operation of Corps Air Ops.  In addition to 6 planes lost because of flood waters, one vanished when a sudden localized snow flurry reduced visibility to zero, 2 were torn from their moorings by high winds and were turned over and 2 crashed in attempting to take off because frost formed on their wings.  35th Infantry attacked to the east.  All Corps artillery battalions participated in a schedule of pre-arranged fires from H minus 30 minutes to H plus 48 minutes during which 23 towns, 10 CPs, 29 enemy artillery locations, 5 farmhouses and 23 wooded areas were attacked.  Neutralization fires were continued all day.  Enemy infantry and artillery resistance to the attack was light.  

 

 

 

 

11/19/44

 

 

Fire Mission: 12 rounds fired into town of St Avold.   Battalion Commander and S-3 reconnoinoitered for forward position in vicinity of Racrange.  Both XII Corps 80th and 35th Infantry Divisions encountered rising enemy artillery opposition but the attack to the east continued.  80th Infantry artillery and its supporting Corps artillery battalions, including the 267th FAB, fired an active counterbattery program following which enemy artillery firing declined and became negligible after dark.  In the 7 day period ending this date XII Corps Artillery fired 284 240mm howitzer shells.  

 

 

 

 

11/20/44

11/21/44

Racrange/Morhange France

267th FAB left Chenois and moved to Racrange in vicinity of Morhange France.  From firing positions near Morhange, the Battalion supported the XII Corps attack through Morhange firing missions on 11/20 and 11/21.  The caption on a cartoon drawn of a 267th howitzer with a bayonet on the end,  "LUCID" stenciled on the barrel, and German troops surrendering around it says, "3rd Army XII Corps - The 267th FA Battalion (Lucid) (240 mm how) just east of Morhange, France, Nov 44.  Battalion emplaced forward of light arty. positions to engage German artillery which had been firing on our troops.  Battalion CO was Maj Collins."

 

 

 

 

11/20/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 11 rounds fired at enemy battery, harassing and  interdiction fires were fired in town of St Avold.  The 8 inch gun was fired on town of Sarralbe.  Registration by air observer was made on town of Maxstedt.  Germans withdrew the bulk of their forces left only a skeleton force along the XII Corps front.  During their retreat, they still managed to build numerous roadblocks, blow bridges, lay minefields and offer sporadic artillery fire, all of which impeded Corp advances.  The 35th supported by CCB, 6th Armored Division resumed its attack to the east following a 42 minute artillery preparation fired by the organic artillery of the two divisions and 4 supporting Corps artillery battalions, including the 267th.  Light but well organized resistance was encountered so that the supporting artillery continued to fire heavily upon "on call" missions, including several six battalion time-on-target concentrations. 

 

 

 

 

11/21/44

 

 

267th FAB fired harassing and interdiction missions.   Battalion Commander and S-3 reconnoinoitered for forward position in vicinity of Bistroff.  Battalion given order to move out at 1200.  XII Corps 80th Infantry secured 3 bridgeheads over the Nied River.  A decline in enemy artillery fire indicated a withdrawal of artillery, probably to positions east of the Saar River.  The amount of ammunition arriving to artillery units improved.  

 

 

 

 

11/22/44

11/26/44

Bistroff/Gros Tenquien France

267th FAB moved 14 kilometers to Bistroff in vicinity of Gros Tenquien on 11/21.  From firing positions near Gros Tenquien, the Battalion supported the XII Corps attack through Gros Tenquien with fire missions each day. 

 

 

 

 

11/22/44

 

 

267th FAB fired harassing and interdiction missions.  Battery B gun positions received one round every five minutes from 1800 to 1900 and two round every thirty minutes from 1900 to 2000.  Caliber of enemy gun believed to be larger than 88mm.   3rd Army estimation of ammunition needed for a six month period was 25 rounds per gun per day for 8 inch howitzers.   In XII Corps, the fortress city of Metz fell at 1435.  The 6th Armored Division, operating in conjunction with the 35th and 80th Infantry Divisions on the north corps flank made good gains.  

 

 

 

 

11/23/44

 

 

Thanksgiving Day.  267th FAB Fire Mission: 69 rounds fired on Puttelange France as harassing missions.  Battery B positions received counterbattery fire from 1950 to 2320; fifteen rounds fell in area.  In the XII Corps zone, the enemy defended towns and strongpoints with infantry and tanks.  The 35th Infantry Division continued its drive in the zone of the 4th Armored Division, and attacked, reaching Réning and Insming.  A heavy counterattack was thrown against the 35th Infantry.  The infantry supported by strong artillery fires repulsed the threat and inflicted heavy losses.  A 30 minute artillery preparation in support of an attack by the 26th Infantry and the 4th Armored Divisions was fired by the organic artillery of both divisions and four supporting Corps artillery battalions.  Heavy resistance was encountered in the vicinity of Albestroff so that strong artillery fires were continued on call.  

 

 

 

 

11/24/44

 

 

267th FAB fired harassing missions. In the XII Corps zone, the 6th Armored Division captured Vallatte in its push toward Puttelange.  The volume of enemy artillery fire increased throughout the 3rd Army area as the advance approached the Saar River.  Medium caliber fire coming from new areas tended to indicate also that the enemy was bringing up additional artillery for defense of the River.  To the north, the 80th Infantry Division launched a new attack to the east, took Faulquemont, Mainvillers and reached an area northeast of Laudrefang, in a drive on St Avold.  

 

 

 

 

11/25/44

 

 

Fire Mission: 29 rounds fired.  Battalion fired in support of 80th Infantry Division and 6th Armored Division.  Adjusted on enemy battery by air observer.   Battalion Commander and S-3 reconnoinoitered for forward positions in vicinity of Diffembach. XII Corps experienced stiff resistance from the Maginot forts in the vicinity of Longville and resisted with Panzer units in the southern portion of the zone.  Weather was poor with rain, fog and low clouds.  Enemy artillery was light that day. The 6th Armored Division occupied Remeringen and entered Hirbach.  Attacking strongly on the corps north flank, the 80th Infantry Division elements made substantial gains through the Maginot Line. 

 

 

 

 

11/26/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 90 rounds fired.  The town of Sarrenguemines was harassed by 8 inch gun.  Missions were fired on enemy troops and strong points.  Air adjustment of one battery on an enemy gun in house and enemy battery; effect reported good. 3rd Army intelligence reported heavy rail movements, of a size indicating several divisions, into the 3rd Army zone.  In the XII Army zone, slight progress was made by the 35th Infantry Division, which stopped to regroup its forces, while the 6th Armored Division continued to attack and took Holving.  On the north, the 80th Infantry Division cleared Valmont, Folschweiler, while some elements entered the important city of St Avold.    300 240mm rounds were expended in the previous 7 days by Corps artillery.  The Rear Echelon Headquarters had 190 officers and 500 enlisted troops with 242 vehicles attached to it.  

 

 

 

 

11/27/44

12/2/44

Diffembach France

267th FAB left Bistroff and took up new positions in the vicinity of Diffembach.  Battalion fired its first round into Germany and fired missions in support of the attack of Diffembach.  2nd Gun Section fires first round into German decorated with "FAE" on it, the name of one of the soldier's wife

 

 

 

 

11/27/44

 

Diffembach France

Fire Mission: 24 rounds fired; 267th FAB located Diffembach France and fired harassing missions on towns of Liplingen, Sarrgemund, Folkingen, Forbach, Grosblittersdorfer Germany and Kleinblittersdorf Germany.  Withdrawing toward the Siegfried Line before the attacks of XII Corps, the enemy offered resistance varying from strong to scattered.  6th Armored Division captured Lixingen-les-St Avold, Lanningen, Vahl-Ebersing, Maxstedt, Cappel and Barst-Marienthal.  , The 80th liberates St. Avold, the one-time German Army headquarters and a coal center for the German war machine.  80th Infantry Division experienced four enemy counterattacks all of which were repulsed by massed artillery fires.

 

 

 

 

11/28/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 31 rounds fired harassing missions into Forbach, Sarrenguemines, Grosbliederstroff and Wittring France.  Attached 8 inch guns fired two rounds per hour on the city of Saarbrucken Germany.  In XII Corps zone, 6th Armored Division captures Diffembach, Cappel, Barst, Biding and Marienthal.  The Wehrmacht began to bring in additional artillery to defend the Saar River against an Allied crossing.  Enemy light and medium artillery fire was extremely light, whereas heavy long-range artillery fire continued moderate to heavy, indicating that the enemy's more mobile weapons were now joining his heavy artillery in positions east of the Saar.  

 

 

 

 

11/29/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 27 rounds fired harassing missions into Forbach, Sarrenguemines, Grosbliederstroff and Witting  France.  Attached 8 inch guns fired harassing missions on the city of Saarbrucken Germany.  XII Corps prepares to continue its attack to the east by regrouping a majority of its forces.  

 

 

 

 

11/30/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 93 rounds fired on harassing missions into Sarrenguemines and Forbach France.  Attached 8 inch guns fired harassing missions on city of Saarbrucken Germany.  Gun flashed observed by Battery A gun positions.  Private Fred Ackley, Battery C, wounded at Diffembach and awarded a Purple Heart.  XII Corps continues to regroup the majority of its forces.   Enemy activity in XII Corps zone was limited to harassing artillery and mortar fire and active patrolling.  

 

 

 

 

11/1/44

11/30/44

 

3rd Army Summary for Month: November opened with the enemy continuing his defensive tactics and hoping that winter stalemates have been achieved in which he could rest, refit and reorganize his battered divisions.  He concentrated upon defensive reorganization of the terrain between the line of contact and the Siegfried Line, constructing anti-tank ditches, communications and fire trenches, pillboxes and minefields.  Barbed wire was used extensively and prisoners of war frequently mentioned that dugouts and  foxholes were being winter-proofed.  On 11/8, 3rd Army opened the Battle of Germany which upset the enemy's hopes for a winter breathing spell.  XII Corps delivered the attack, preceded by a devastating artillery preparation which disrupted enemy communications and curtailed the employment of his artillery.  The Seille and Moselle Rivers, at flood stage as a result of unusually heavy autumn rains, imposed an unforeseen obstacle to 3rd Army.  Bridgeheads had to be won and maintained only by the utmost effort.  Bad weather throughout the entire month greatly hampered 3rd Army operations, limiting the use of air support and confining armor and tank destroyers largely to the roads and the enemy took every advantage of the defensive opportunities offered by the weather.  The enemy fought his delaying action from one critical terrain feature to the next.  Practically every village was turned into a defensive strongpoint and maximum use was made of the limited amount of artillery available to him.  In the Metz area, the enemy's attempt to make a fortress stand, hinged upon the elaborate system of forts, was shattered between 11/15-20.  By the end of the month the enemy was forced into the Siegfried Line, where he massed the greatest concentration of artillery yet to confront the 3rd Army.  Trench foot constituted a serious problem due to constant exposure of feet to water and cold.  4,587 cases were admitted to division clearing stations with 95% determined to be of no further value for combat duty during the winter months.  It suffered an average of 702 casualties a day or 21,059 for the month.  200 towns were captured.  The enemy lost 374 artillery pieces 75mm or greater and the 3rd Army lost 8.

 

 

 

 

12/1/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 50 rounds fired in harassing missions into Sarrenguemines and Forbach France.  Attached 8 inch guns fired harassing missions on City of Saarbrucken Germany.  Battalion Commander and party made reconnaissance  for forward positions in vicinity of Marienthal-Barst.  Battalion given order to displace to forward positions in the vicinity of Marienthal-Barst.  XII Corps artillery continued its heavy harassing and interdiction fires, firing no less than 39 towns using the heavy, long-range weapons to attack Saarbrucken, Saarguemines and Forbach.  Enemy artillery in turn showed an increasing tendency, especially in the XX Corps zone, to attack small town behind our lines in recognition of our use thereof for command posts and shelters.  The 6th Armored Divisions maintained patrols while the 80th Infantry Division maintained its positions, repulsing light counterattacks.  

 

 

 

 

12/2/44

12/7/44

Biding/Marienthal-Barst France

267th FAB left Diffembach and arrived at Biding on 12/2.  From firing positions near Biding and Marienthal-Barst France, the Battalion supported the XII Corps attack through Diffembach and Marienthal-Barst.  3rd Army analysis of German railway movements indicated that the major portion of rail traffic during period of 11/17 to 12/2 was toward the Saarbrucken and Eifel areas.  A total of 300 trains were observed on November 17 , with marshalling yards very active.   

 

 

 

 

12/2/44

 

Biding/Marienthal-Barst France

267th FAB Fire Mission: 40 rounds fired harassing missions into city of Sarrenguemines and fired interdiction missions (25 rounds) on railroad yards in Saarbrucken.  Registration on town of Diebling France by flash. Battery C 243rd FAB Battalion given march order to relocated to Marienthal-Barst, departed 0900 and arrived 1200.   XII Corps Artillery reinforced the 80th ID with one light and one medium battalion and the 6th Armored Division with one medium battalion, one field artillery group of one light, two medium and one heavy battalion (the 267th FAB).  Three heavy battalions, plus one battery, six inch guns were used in general support of the 3rd Army.  An analysis of enemy railroad movement at this time indicated that the major portion of rail traffic during the period 11/17-12/2 was toward Saarbrucken and Eifel areas.  On 11/17 a total of 300 trains were observed by tactical reconnaissance and marshalling yards were particularly active.  On 11/18-19 reports indicate a total of 84 trains moving into the same area, with a large number of trains stationary in marshalling yards on routes leading into the northern zone of the 3rd Army and southern zone of the 1st Army.  On 11/26, 46 trains were observed, 33 of which moved west or southwest.  Finally on 12/2 the rail movement analysis indicated a definite buildup of enemy troops and supplies in that same zone.  XIX Tactical Air Command lost nine planes and pilots in support of the 3rd Army.  

 

 

 

 

12/3/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 44 rounds fired.  Periodic fires were continued onto railroads and yards in Saarbrucken Germany, and counterbattery fire.  A six gun enemy battery of light caliber was located by Battalion air observer just north of Tenteling.  These guns were firing on the towns of Henriville and Cappel.  Battery B was adjusted on target and the adjusted coordinates were sent to 731 FAB, who was able to fire their Battery C on it.  Battalion air observer observed all fire and reported the target well covered but observation was such that he could not determine damage to enemy material and personnel. In the XII Corps sector, 80th Infantry and 6th Armored Divisions went on the attack.  The organic artillery of both divisions and VII Corps artillery battalions (including the 267th FAB) supported this attack with a schedule of prearranged fires from H minus 45 minutes to H plus 63 minutes.  Enemy artillery positions, towns, command posts and supply points were among the targets attacked.  During the previous 7 days, XII Corps fired 436 240mm shells.  

 

 

 

 

12/4/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 42 rounds fired harassing and interdiction missions onto railroads and yards in Saarbrucken Germany.  Battalion also fired prepared missions of XII Corps Artillery in support of 80th Infantry Division and 6th Armored Division.  In XII Corps zone, the 6th Armored Division reopened its attack, capturing Cadenbrown, Metzingen, Tenteling, Diebling and Ebering.  In the northern XII Corps sector the attack of the 35th and 80th Infantry and 6th Armored Divisions progressed favorably against small arms and mortar fire but only light artillery opposition.  The 35th Infantry Division's 137th Infantry advanced 2 1/2 miles through Puttelange and cleared Guebenhouse and Ernestville.  

 

 

 

 

12/5/44

 

 

1230 Enemy plane flying low.  267th FAB fired harassing and interdiction missions on Saarbrucken and Sarrgemund.  Battalion Commander and party made reconnaissance  for forward positions in vicinity of Diebling.  In the XII Corps zone, the 6th Armored Division captured Rouhling and Ippling, west of Sarrenguemines, while the 80th took the high ground and improved its positions to the north.  3rd Army intelligence reported a general enemy withdrawal into the Siegfried Line was in progress with defend and delay tactics.  

 

 

 

 

12/6/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 42 rounds fired harassing and interdiction missions onto Saarbrucken.  S-3 made reconnaissance of forward position in vicinity of Guebenhouse.  In the XII Corps zone, the 6th Armored Division took Welferding.  The 80th Division encountered stiffening resistance at Forbach and the 35th Infantry Division engaged in heavy fighting in the outskirts of Sarrenguemines.  The 4th Armored Division was engaged heavily at Singling and Bining, where numerous tanks, pillboxes, antitank mines and artillery were encountered.  

 

 

 

 

12/7/44

12/11/44

Guebenhouse France

267th FAB departed Biding and arrived Guebenhouse on 12/7.   From firing positions near Guebenhouse, the Battalion supported the XII Corps attack through Guebenhouse France with harassing and interdiction fires

 

 

 

 

12/7/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 31 rounds fired harassing missions on town of Neu Fechingen and buildings in countryside.  Attached 8 inch guns fired harassing missions at Sankt Ingbert and Sulzbach.  On the XII Corps north flank, patrols of the 2nd Cavalry Group entered Forbach, 4 miles southeast of Saarbrucken.  The 134th Infantry attacked in the outskirts of Sarrenguemines meeting heavy artillery and mortar fire.  

 

 

 

 

12/8/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 7 rounds fired.   Air Observer located an active enemy battery and adjusted fire on target.  The first round of adjustment fell in position area and Battalion expended 12 rounds on target.  Destruction affect could not be observed because of smoke.  Harassing missions were fired on towns of Blisransbach, Neu Fechingen and Bischmisheim.  Attached 8 inch guns continue to harass Sankt Ingbert.  One gun of Battery A participated in 3rd Army demonstration with Pozit Fuse at Audincourt France. A demonstration was conducted to acquaint the XII Corps artillery with the use and characteristics of a new device called the Pozit Fuse.  The new Top Secret fuse was a special automatic device which exploded automatically by magnetic attraction when it come within approximately 30 feet of either the ground or any metal objects.  General Patton mentioned the new device in his private diary referring to it as "...that funny fuse."  It would be put into use at a time of great need, assisting in the counterattack against the Germans in their Ardennes Offensive.  In the demonstration were one 105mm howitzer battalion, one 155mm battery, one 8 inch howitzer and one 240mm.  Results were extraordinarily effective, very few early bursts occurring and the percentage of effective rounds being 89% for the 105mms, 80% for the 155mms, 92% for the 8 inch, and 100% for the 240mm from the 267th FAB.  A similar demonstration was conducted on 12/10 in conjunction with XX Corps Artillery for artillery personnel with that Corps.   3rd Army intelligence reported that the enemy was using definite routes for infiltrating and returning agents through 3rd Army lines.  Points involved were St Marie Aux Chenes, Thionville, St Avold, Nancy and Hagenau.  Arrangements were made to establish roadblocks along the route.  

 

 

 

 

12/8/44

 

 

Vaccination

 

 

 

 

12/9/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 36 rounds fired interdiction and counterbattery missions onto Blisransbach, Brebach Fechingen, Bischmisheim Germany.  Attached 8 inch guns continue to harass Sankt Ingbert.  4th Armored Division Artillery in the XII Corps sector was withdrawn from the line and placed in reserve for necessary re-fitting and maintenance.  A total of 18 3rd Army artillery spotter aircraft was lost during the week just ended, this being the highest percentage of loss in any period to date.  Of these, 5 planes were lost due to enemy action, 6 because of high winds, 5 in flying accidents, and 2 due to miscellaneous causes.  A tendency was noted on the part of the enemy to reverse his prior practice of silencing his artillery and antiaircraft artillery whenever our Air Ops were aloft.  In consequence, our aircraft encountered increasing antiaircraft opposition but at the same time increasingly successful in locating active enemy artillery positions.  An additional survey of rail movements for the period 12/3-9, resulted in estimate of an enemy buildup of 6 1/2 divisions in the Eifel area.  Much railroad activity was noted in marshalling yards.  Street fighting continued in Sarrenguemines.      

 

 

 

 

12/10/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 29 rounds fired; interdiction, harassment and counterbattery missions.  Battalion Commander and party made reconnaissance for forward positions in vicinity of Neufgrange.  Attached Battery in process of displacing to vicinity of Ippling.  Enemy artillery increasingly interdicted and harassed towns and supply routes in our rear areas utilizing heavy caliber long range weapons.  Fire upon our forward elements continued heavy but was from light caliber weapons exclusively.  The continued heavy fighting was reflected in the ammunition expenditures for the week ending today.  XII Corps fired 617 240mm shells.  The 137th Infantry crossed the Saar River to enter Sarrenguemines from the South.   A flag raising ceremony, the first held in Germany by personnel of the 3rd Army was held in Eft -Hellendorf.  Townspeople assembled outside of the military government office for the reading of the proclamation and raising of the U.S. flag.  

 

 

 

 

12/11/44

12/17/44

Neufgrange France

267th FAB left Guebenhouse and arrived Neufgrange on 12/11.  From firing positions near Neufgrange France, the Battalion supported the XII Corps attack through Sarrenguemines France

 

 

 

 

12/11/44

 

Neufgrange France

267th FAB moved to Neufgrange France.  Service Battery CP located in Hambach France.  Battalion spent time organizing positions.  In the XII Corps zone, advances of 1 to 2 miles were made by various elements of the 35th Infantry Division north and east of Sarrenguemines while fighting in the city continued.  Division elements reached the German border at Blies-Ebersing.

 

 

 

 

12/12/44

 

 

267th FAB Fired onto St Armua, Wittersheim France, Blisransbach, Blieskastel, and Webenheim Germany.  Also Nieder Wurzbach and Sankt Ingbert; large building erupted with orange flame after receiving two direct hits.  Attached 8 inch guns harassed towns of Deux Ponts and Kirkel Germany.  Several patrol and reconnaissance were flown by Battalion pilots in area designated XII Corps Artillery.  A strong night counterattack against the 35th Infantry Division was repulsed by the defensive fires of the Division Artillery and six supporting battalions of the XII Corps artillery.  Thereafter a 13 battalion time-on-target concentration was fired upon Bliesbruck following which 35th Infantry Division took the town against light resistance and captured many prisoners.  

 

 

 

 

12/13/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 100 rounds fired harassing missions onto Sankt Ingbert and Wittersheim France, Nieder Wurzbach, Blisransbach, Blieskastel, and Webenheim Germany; Attached 8 inch guns harassed town of Deux Ponts. Battery drew enemy fire and Battalion plane was fired upon. In the XII Corps zone, the 320th Infantry made another crossing of the Blies River near Bliesbruck four miles east of Sarrenguemines.  The crossing made under heavy artillery fire while supporting weapons were ferried across the river in the rear of advancing troops.   

 

 

 

 

12/14/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 54  rounds of harassing missions fired onto Hassel, Nieder Wurzbach, Lantz Zirchen, Mimbach, Sankt Ingbert, Webenheim and Blieskastel Germany.  Battalion fired on enemy tanks and infantry.  Attached 8 inch guns continued to harass town of Deux Ponts.  In the XII Corps zone, the 346th Infantry reached the German border 8 1/2 miles east of Sarrenguemines and took Rimling, while the 347th cleared Obergailbach, six miles east of Sarrenguemines.  3rd Army gave clearance to use the Pozit fuse in the inner antiaircraft artillery zone at Saarlauterm.  

 

 

 

 

12/15/44

 

 

Fire Mission: 52  rounds of harassing fire missions fired onto Hassel, Mimbach, Nieder Wurzbach, Lantz Kitchen, Mimbach, Webenheim  and Blieskastel Germany. Attached 8 inch guns continued to harass town of Deux Ponts.  An ammunition or gasoline dump was hit in the town of Walsheim Germany setting off explosions which the observer described as "looking like a Fourth of July celebration."  XII Corps continued to advance slowly against heavy resistance.  A total of 981 Allied POWs were liberated at a camp located near Sarrenguemines.  80th Infantry Division commenced to move back into line on the south flank of XII Corps, relieving elements of the 12th Armored Division which thereupon reverted to Seventh Army.  To provide for this change and also for the impending committal of III Corps on the Saar Front, artillery of XII Corps was regrouped.  

 

 

 

 

12/16/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: 117  rounds of harassing and interdiction missions fired onto Hassel, Nieder Wurzbach and Blieskastel Germany.  Battalion Air Observation Plane adjusted Battalion on enemy battery.  Enemy ammunition was hit.  This concentration was repeated with good effect reported on both concentrations.  XII Corps Artillery concentration on another enemy battery was observed by Battalion Air Observer.  Good effect reported.  Battalion ACP fired the 731st  FAB on enemy battery and two other enemy batteries.  Effect reported good.  On 12/8 an enemy battery was located near the town of Freudenberg.  Battery A was adjusted on the target and Battery B came in on fire for effect.  On 12/15 the Battalion S-2 was able to visit the location of this enemy battery and found evidence of one direct hit on enemy battery (105 caliber).  Considerable ammunition was left and some enemy personnel injured.  Battle of the Bulge beings with spearheads of SS Panzer Army attacking in VIII and VII Corps zones of the 1st Army.  III Corps, with 6th Armored Division attached, was committed in the center of the 3rd Army front on the Saar.  Attached initially to the Corps were Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, III Corps Artillery, one 105mm Howitzer battalion, one 155mm Howitzer battalion, one 155mm Gun battalion and one 8-inch Gun battery, all detached from XX Corps, and one field artillery group, one field artillery observation battalion, one armored field artillery battalion and one 4.5 inch Gun battalion, all detached from XII Corps.  One 240mm Howitzer battalion (the 267th FAB) was detached from XII Corps and retained under 3rd Army control, being utilized on Military Police duty.   

 

 

 

 

12/16/44

1/25/45

 

Battle of the Bulge

 

 

 

 

12/17/44

 

 

Fire Mission: 117  rounds of harassing missions during the night fired onto Hassel,  Nieder Wurzbach. Lutz Kitchen, Blickweiter and Blieskastel Germany.  Attached 8 inch guns continued to harass town of Deux Ponts.  Heavy enemy artillery fire on friendly tanks.  3rd Army zone: Enemy activity in and around the town of Forbach was strong so that artillery with III Corps attacked the town repeatedly throughout the day.  Infantry patrols went out in this area were accompanied by artillery forward observers to assure prompt artillery support if and when the patrols should be pinned down.  XII Corps fired 700 240mm shells during the week ending today.  

 

 

 

 

12/17/44

 

 

267th FAB removed from combat, relieved from XII Corps and placed on special duty with the Provost marshal, 3rd Army as of 0600 12/18. Battery C, 243 FAB relieved of attachment with 267th FAB.  The Battalion was ordered to move to Johannes Bannburg Concentration Camp near Boulay to take over the administration of the Allied Prisoner of War Camp which was overrun by 3rd Army on 12/1.

 

 

 

 

12/18/44

 

 

267th FAB Fire Mission: Battalion fires 193 rounds on hostile batteries, excellent effect. These were the last rounds fired in anger by guns of the 267th FAB.   The Battalion was given the mission of guarding bridges and administering and evacuating POWs in the 3rd Army area.  This is pursuant to Troop Assignment No. A-75, 17 Dec 44, AG 322 GNMCC.    3rd Army military police and all sectors concerned with transportation were confronted with the most complex troop movement problem of the campaign when 3rd Army  was given the mission of attacking the south flank of the enemy's Ardennes salient.  Special officer couriers were dispatched to each military police battalion with 4 troop movement routes.  All possible personnel were concentrated on traffic duty.  There was a constant flow of traffic over the period of movement, more than 11,200 vehicles passing over the 4 routes.  

 

 

 

 

12/19/44

12/29/44

Niedervisse France

267th FAB left Neufgrange and arrived  at Allied Prisoner of War Camp near Niedervisse and Boulay on 12/19.  Then, Battery C traveled 35 miles south to Nancy and assumed mission to guard the Third Army Rear Command Post.  Battery B moved 31 miles in the same direction to Pont-à-Mousson to guard roads and bridges in the vicinity.  Along with the 4405 Quartermaster Service Company, 1st and 3rd Companies, 151st French Infantry Regiment, 31 Gendarmes from the 10th Legion Gendarmes and the 4th and 8th Squadrons, 4th Regiment, French Republican Guards, Battery B guarded 7 railway tunnels, 27 railway bridges, 1 highway overpass and 14 highway bridges. The remainder of the Battalion (Headquarters, Service and A Batteries) remained to administer and evacuate the liberated prisoners.  On 12/28, the former prisoners were evacuated to Toul France.  On 12/29, the last of the 267th artillerymen left, traveling 37 miles to  Hayange France.    Also on 12/19, planning had already been in progress whereby 3rd Army would pivot to attack the south flank of the enemy penetration developing against the First Army in the Luxembourg/Belgium area.  III Corps was withdrawn from the Saar front and moved north to the vicinity of Arlon.  4th Armored and 80th Infantry Divisions, together with their organic artillery were detached from XII Corps, attached to III Corps and moved rapidly north from positions on the extreme south flank of the 3rd Army.    Artillery was extensively regrouped to support the offensive operations on the northern front.  All regrouped units moved immediately and closed in the vicinity of the III Corps artillery assembly area at Villers during the night of 12/19-20.  From 12/19 to 12/28, the 3rd Army Forward Echelon Headquarters proceeded ninety miles to a new location in Luxembourg.  Because of the shift north, reconnaissance for a location for the Rear Echelon were made, starting 12/21 in 5 locations.  Esch sur Alzette Luxembourg was selected on 12/29 and the advance party proceeded there on 1/1/45.  

 

 

 

 

12/20/44

 

 

3rd Army Tactical Echelon headquarters moves to Luxembourg.  Rear headquarters remains in Nancy France. 

 

 

 

 

12/21/44

 

 

3rd Army units assume defense of the city of Luxembourg, the steel mill at Differdange and radio station Luxembourg at Junglinster.  Enemy forces continue to advance in VIII Corps zone.  Bastogne is cut off and surrounded.  3rd Army is preparing to attack the south flank of the enemy salient.

 

 

 

 

12/22/44

 

 

3rd Army assaults enemy forces.  Dissemination to all corps and divisions of detailed information concerning Germans operating in American uniforms and equipment was completed.  Unnecessary civilian traffic was cleared from roads.  The Provost Marshal was directed to clear at his discretion any main supply route except for the most essential civilian traffic.  

 

 

 

 

12/23/44

 

 

3rd Army General Patton's prayer for fair weather was followed in a few days by a break in the lowering skies, which had prevented full air support.  Clear weather aided tremendously in halting the enemy's Ardennes penetration and in driving him back into the Siegfried Line.  The General's prayer was: "Almighty and most merciful Father, we humbly beseech Thee, of Thy great goodness, to restrain these immoderate rains with which we have had to contend.  Grant us fair weather for battle.  Graciously harken to us as soldiers who call upon Thee that armed with Thy power, we may advance from victory to victory, and crush the oppression and wickedness of our enemies, and establish Thy justice among men and nations. Amen."  Because of the threat in the rear areas, in consequence of the fluid tactical situation, the military police became a primary force in the maintenance of security and the apprehension of suspected spies and saboteurs.   

 

 

 

 

12/25/44

 

 

Every means was used by the enemy to disrupt supply and communications in the 3rd Army rear areas.  A delay in delivery of supplies to III Corps was caused by sabotage, the rail line between Longwy France and Arlon Luxembourg, having been out in five places.  

 

 

 

 

12/27/44

 

 

3rd Army military government personnel to the south evacuated more than 3,000 German civilians and approximately 2,500 scattered villagers from the Saar River area.  They were moved to concentration areas to the rear of regimental lines both for military security reasons and to simplify control problems.  

 

 

 

 

12/28/44

 

 

An investigation was made by 3rd Army into the possibility of enemy agents using pigeons as a return means of communication.  

 

 

 

 

12/29/44

 

Hayange France

The 267th Left Niedervisse and arrived Hayange France where it established its headquarters with Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, Service Battery and the Medical Detachment   

 

 

 

 

12/31/44

 

 

267th FAB Headquarters still located in Hayange France.  Men who served with Battery C from 1/1/44 to 12/31/44 by state: Alabama 4, Arkansas 4, California 7, Florida 1, Georgia 12, Illinois 11, Indiana 3, Kentucky 3, Louisiana 1, Maine 1, Michigan 7, Minnesota 3, Missouri 2, New Hampshire 4, New Jersey 5, New York 13, North Carolina 7, North Dakota 2, Ohio 12, Oklahoma 1,Oregon 1, Pennsylvania 7, Rhode Island 2, South Carolina 2, South Dakota 5, Tennessee 3, Texas 3, Virginia 4, West Virginia 1, Wisconsin 6

 

 

 

 

1/1/45

1/31/45

 

Officers of the 267th FAB completed a reconnaissance of all railway lines within the 3rd Army area and determined location of important bridges and tunnels that were unguarded or inappropriately guarded.  The following installations were guarded in connection with the security of Lines of Communications during January by 3rd Army Provost Marshal Security Subsection troops: 36 Railway bridges; 7 Railway tunnels; 25 Highway bridges; 1 Highway overpass; Twelfth Army Group Communications Center, Luxembourg; 3rd Army Radio Center Luxembourg; Post Telegraph and Telephone Building, Metz; Repeater Station, Aubange Belgium; Post Telegraph and Telephone Building Luxembourg; SHAEF Radio north, Sandweiler Luxembourg; and SHAEF Radio west, Longwy France by the 267th FAB (less Battery C, being used for defense of Rear Command Post in Nancy France and stockade guard for general prisoner).  Other units guarding these installations include: 4405 Quartermaster Service Company (an all-black unit); 1st and 3rd Companies, 151st Infantry Regiment (French); and 734th FAB

 

 

 

 

1/7/45

1/9/45

 

Over 3 days the 3rd Army Rear Echelon Headquarters moves from Nancy France, 69 miles north, to  Esch sur Alzette. It was necessary to establish the HQ in 3 large schools (using 2 more as barracks), an office building, and numerous stores and apartments.  One small hotel was used for overnight guests.  Officers were billeted with private families after the city and steel plant officials had conducted a door-to-door survey for available rooms.  Motor parks were all in open lots due to lack of garage space.  One officer mess for 245 and one enlisted mess for 850 were established in the Supply Group building.  

 

 

 

 

1/27/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 91 Personnel; Battery A Cons La Grandville France 104 Personnel; Battery B Virton Belgium 102 Personnel; Battery C Belval Luxembourg  100 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 32 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 12 Personnel. Total 441 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

1/31/45

 

 

Awarded Bronze Service Star for Northern France Campaign

 

 

 

 

2/1/45

2/28/45

 

The following installations were guarded in connection with the security of Lines of Communications during February by 3rd Army Provost Marshal troops: 35 Railway bridges and tunnels; 16 Highway bridges; Repeater Station Aubange Belgium; Twelfth Army Group Radio , Romain France ; Twelfth Army Group Radio, Kapellenberg Germany;  3rd Army Radio Center Luxembourg;  Post Telegraph and Telephone Buildings located in Luxembourg towns of Bettembourg, Dudelange, Kayl,  Differdange, Bascharage and two other locations by the 267th FAB (less ten enlisted men from Battery C, being used for stockade guard for general prisoner).  Other units guarding these installations include: 1st and 3rd Companies, 151st Infantry Regiment (French); 734th FAB; 631st Tank Destroyer Battalion; and 11th Belgian Fusilier Battalion attached for administration and training. 

 

 

 

 

2/1/45

 

Metz France

734th FAB Unit Journal 1/31/45: Fr PM Def Sec: On or about 11200Feb45 you will be relieved from guarding PT and T Bldg Metz by Btry C 267 FABN

 

 

 

 

2/3/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 91 Personnel; Battery A Cons La Grandville France 105 Personnel; Battery B Virton Belgium 102 Personnel; Battery C Metz France 100 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 31 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 13 Personnel. Total 442 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

2/6/45

2/7/45

 

3rd Army Rear Echelon HQ moved 12 miles from Esch sur Alzette to join the Forward Echelon in the city of Luxembourg.  It occupied 2 office buildings, three schools, several residences and stores and five hotels.  

 

 

 

 

2/9/45

 

 

3rd Army Prisoner of War Enclosure Number 13 in Arlon Belgium opens

 

 

 

 

2/10/45

 

Esch sur Alzette Luxembourg

734th FAB Unit Journal 2/10/45: Maj Heenon, 267 FA arrived for instruction in operation of PW Camp

 

 

 

 

2/10/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 92 Personnel; Battery A Cons La Grandville France 104 Personnel; Battery B Virton Belgium 102 Personnel; Battery C Metz France 101 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 33 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 13 Personnel. Total 445 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

2/17/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 93 Personnel; Battery A Cons La Grandville France 104 Personnel; Battery B Virton Belgium 102 Personnel; Battery C Metz France 103 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 31 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 13 Personnel. Total 446 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

2/22/45

 

 

A 3rd Army Provost marshal POW Subsection conference was held regarding the replacement of Headquarters and Service Batteries, 734th FAB at Army Prisoner of War Enclosures.  Generally the plan called for the substitution of Headquarters Company, 631st Tank Destroyer Battalion for Headquarters and Service Batteries, 734th FAB.  It would be necessary to augment the Headquarters Company, 631 Tank Destroyer Battalion with certain commissioned and enlisted personnel and equipment from the 267th FAB and the Army Military Police Escort Guard companies to compensate for the difference in strength, organization and equipment in the Headquarters Company of the 631st Tank Destroyer Battalion and that the Headquarters and Service Batteries of the 734th FAB.  

 

 

 

 

2/24/45

2/28/45

 

The 734th FAB was relieved from tactical guarding of all installations in the 3rd Army area on 2/24/45 and assigned to its primary mission.   In the process of relieving the 734th FAB from duty, the Executive Officer of the 267th FAB took over command of the 3rd Army Prisoner of War Enclosure Number 13 in Arlon Belgium.  Assisting him were officers and enlisted men of the 267th FAB and the 631st Tank Destroyer Battalion.  The 267th FAB took over guarding all installations in France since Belgian Battalions cannot be used in France.  The 11th Belgian Fusilier Battalion was used for guarding installations in the Duchy of Luxembourg and Belgium, exclusive of the City of Luxembourg which was guarded by two companies from the 631st Tank Destroyer Battalion.  Enclosure 13 Arlon was opened 2/9/45.  Over the month of Feb it received 6,763 POWs, Evacuated 5,727 so on 2/28 its count was 1,036 POWs. During March it received 4,248 prisoners and evacuated 5,331.    It was closed 3/9/45

 

 

 

 

2/24/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 94 Personnel; Battery A Cons La Grandville France 103 Personnel; Battery B Virton Belgium 101 Personnel; Battery C Metz France 101 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 31 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 13 Personnel. Total 443 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

2/25/45

 

Esch Luxembourg

FAB Unit Journal 2/25/45: 734 FA Det relieved of assignment at PWE 13 by Det fr 267 FA BN

 

 

 

 

3/1/45

3/31/45

 

The following installations were guarded in connection with the security of Lines of Communications during March by 3rd Army Provost Marshal Security Subsection troops: 69 Railway bridges and tunnels; 45 Highway bridges; 8 Highway check points; 3rd Army Radio Center Strassen Germany;  Repeater Station Aubange Belgium; Twelfth Army Group Radio , Kapellenberg Germany; Twelfth Army Group Radio, Romain France;  SHAEF Mission Luxembourg: Storage room for rare books, Nürburg, Germany; Electric power plant, Trier Germany; Radio installation, Luxembourg; Post Telegraph and Telephone Buildings located in Bettembourg, Dudelange, Kayl, Belvaux, Differdange, Bascharage, Rodange, Petange and Luxembourg by the 267th FAB.  Other units guarding these installations include:  631st Tank Destroyer Battalion; 10th Belgian Fusilier Battalion and 11th Belgian Fusilier Battalion plus two companies (1st and 4th).  The 30th Battalion Chaussers (French) were utilized for tactical guarding of installations in France and Luxembourg but were relieved of these duties upon entering Germany.  

 

 

 

 

3/1/45

3/31/45

 

The Third Army systematically destroyed 2 German Armies in front of it.  First it captured territory up to the Rhine River.  It then destroyed German forces to the south with an outflanking movement across the Moselle River.  Lastly it crossed the Rhine chasing German forces into the interior of Germany.  While making steady advances, Third Army elements met stubborn resistance.  However, it penetrated into the industrial, communications and defensive areas in the heart of Germany.  During the month of March a record number of POWs were evacuated through 3rd Army enclosures.  A total 142,000 POWs were captured during this month.  On 3/31 the daily average was 1,357 POWs.  

 

 

 

 

3/3/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 94 Personnel; Battery A Cons La Grandville France 101 Personnel; Battery B Virton Belgium 101 Personnel; Battery C Metz France 99 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 31 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 12 Personnel. Total 438 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

3/10/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 94 Personnel; Battery A Schieren Luxembourg 101 Personnel; Battery B Arlon Belgium 101 Personnel; Battery C Metz France 98 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 31 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 12 Personnel. Total 437 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

3/17/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 93 Personnel; Battery A Schieren Luxembourg 101 Personnel; Battery B Arlon Belgium 100 Personnel; Battery C Trier Germany 98 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 31 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 12 Personnel. Total 435 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

3/24/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Hayange France 95 Personnel; Battery A Bekond Germany 101 Personnel; Battery B Thionville France100 Personnel; Battery C Trier Germany 100 Personnel;  Sv Battery Hayange France 32 Personnel; Medical Det Hayange France 12 Personnel. Total 440 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

3/31/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Bad Kreuznach Germany 96 Personnel; Battery A Bekond Germany 101 Personnel; Battery B Thionville France 100 Personnel; Battery C Trier Germany 100 Personnel;  Sv Battery Bad Kreuznach Germany 32 Personnel; Medical Det Bad Kreuznach Germany 12 Personnel. Total 441 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

4/1/45

4/30/45

 

The following installations were guarded in connection with the security of Lines of Communications during April by 3rd Army Provost Marshal Security Subsection troops: 50 Railway bridges and tunnels; 144 Highway bridges; 33 Signal installations; and the following special installations, SHAEF Mission Luxembourg: Storage room for rare books, Nurburg; Electric power plant, Trier; Lens factory, Bad Kreuznach, 14th Liaison Air Strip, Counter Intelligence Corps Team, Naval Archives and Military Police Interpreters (ten enlisted men) by the 267th FAB.  Other units guarding these installations include:  631st Tank Destroyer Battalion; 10th Belgian Fusilier Battalion and 11th Belgian Fusilier Battalion, 174th, 270th FAB, 195th Field Artillery Group, 70th Infantry Division and the 13th Armored Division.  Beginning 4/2, the 70th Infantry Division assumed responsibility for security in the rear areas.   

 

 

 

 

4/1/45

4/31/45

 

The Third Army entered the final phase of the European War.  It was a chapter of occupation and mopping up operations.  Once the Rhine was crossed, German resistance was spotty and ineffective.  There was fighting in rear areas as well as forward.  The disintegration of the German Army was evident from the size of German units surrendering and the comparatively small Allied casualties.  The Army still met fierce resistance in isolated exceptions.  The 3rd Army was restricted from advancing east as part of the arrangement with the advancing Russian Army.  It also concentrated forces to prevent Germany's ability to create a "National Redoubt" in South Germany, where forces would make a last stand.  

 

 

 

 

4/8/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Bad Kreuznach Germany 100 Personnel; Battery A Trier Germany 102 Personnel; Battery B Trier Germany 102 Personnel; Battery C Trier Germany 99 Personnel;  Sv Battery Bad Kreuznach Germany 32 Personnel; Medical Det Bad Kreuznach Germany 12 Personnel. Total 447 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

4/10/45

4/18/45

 

The 267th FAB was relieved from assignment to the Provost Marshal and assigned to the XVth Army.

 

 

 

 

4/14/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Trier Germany 100 Personnel; Battery A Trier Germany 102 Personnel; Battery B Trier Germany 101 Personnel; Battery C Trier Germany 99 Personnel;  Sv Battery Trier Germany 33 Personnel; Medical Det Trier Germany 12 Personnel. Total 447 Personnel. 

 

 

 

 

4/18/45

 

 

The 267th FAB was relieved from assignment to the XVth Army and reassigned back to the Provost Marshal Security Subsection.  

 

 

 

 

4/21/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Haszfurt Germany 98 Personnel; Battery A Bamberg Germany 102 Personnel; Battery B Haszfurt Germany 102 Personnel; Battery C Zeil Germany 99 Personnel;  Sv Battery Haszfurt Germany 33 Personnel; Medical Det Haszfurt Germany 12 Personnel. Total 446 Personnel

 

 

 

 

4/28/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Haszfurt Germany 113 Personnel; Battery A Bamberg Germany 132 Personnel; Battery B Furth Germany 118 Personnel; Battery C Zeil Germany 133 Personnel;  Sv Battery Haszfurt Germany 39 Personnel; Medical Det Haszfurt Germany 12 Personnel.Total 558 Personnel (Battalion received 115 reinforcements).

 

 

 

 

4/29/45

 

Munich Germany

The 697th FAB, which is the last 240mm unit in combat in the ETO, fires the last 240mm round against the German army during the drive to occupy Munich.  

5/1/45

5/8/45

 

During this period the Security Subsection was engaged in security of the Army Command Post and in guarding lines of communication.  Tactical guarding of: 31 Highway bridges; 8 railway bridges; 8 signal bridges; 14th Liaison Squadron airstrip; Counter Intelligence Corps Interrogation Team, Bamberg; and Naval Archives Tambach by the 267th FAB.  Other units guarding these installations were the 174th FAB and the  631 Tank Destroyer Battalion.  

 

 

 

 

5/5/45

 

 

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Schwabach Germany 116 Personnel; Battery A Bamberg Germany 131 Personnel; Battery B Furth Germany 130 Personnel; Battery C Herzogenaurach Germany 133 Personnel;  Sv Battery Schwabach Germany 39 Personnel; Medical Det Schwabach Germany 12 Personnel.Total 561 Personnel; Captured 3 POWs.  

 

 

 

 

5/7/45

 

 

The 267th FAB was relieved from its guard responsibilities by the 36th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Brigade, and was assigned to the Prisoner of War Subsection.  The following day the 174th FAB was also reassigned to the Prisoner of War Subsection.  The Security Lines of Communications was disbanded with the capitulation of Germany.  Upon arrival the POW Section had 91,714 prisoners on hand with 174 admitted to hospitals and 12, 904 taken at overrun German Military Hospitals.  3rd Army Letter of Instruction issued this date directs the 33rd Field Artillery Brigade to be the 3rd Army Agency responsible for: collecting, protecting , supplying, administering and evacuating all Allied POWs and civilian internees; and collecting, guarding and protecting displaced persons.  It will establish and administer Allied POW installations and civilian internment camps.

 

 

 

 

5/8/45

 

 

VE Day with the surrender of Germany and cessation of hostilities in the Europe Theater.  3rd Army artillery fired 5,870,843 rounds or 158,207 tons of ammunition during the campaign (8/1/44-5/8/45).  Artillery observation aircraft executed 87,002 missions totaling 93,933 flying hours, of which 22,865 were fire missions.  The Army became operational with 636 field artillery pieces of 105mm caliber or larger.  On 5/8, the number was at a high of 1,464.  

 

 

 

 

5/19/45

6/16/45

Auerbach Germany

 The 267th ran a camp that housed 20,000 German POWs in four former German Army barracks, separated the prisoners into four separate “cages,” or confined areas.  One held 5,000 men with some role in the German military, another 5,000 Hungarians who served alongside the German Army; another contained an assortment of German military men, and one with 1,200 women who served the Wehrmacht in noncombat roles.  

 

 

 

 

5/19/45

 

Auerbach Germany

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Auerbach 111 Personnel; Battery A Auerbach 129 Personnel; Battery B Auerbach 128 Personnel; Battery C Auerbach 128 Personnel;  Sv Battery Auerbach 37 Personnel; Medical Det Auerbach 12 Personnel .  Total 545 Personnel

 

 

 

 

5/26/45

 

Auerbach Germany

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Auerbach 115 Personnel; Battery A Auerbach 130 Personnel; Battery B Auerbach 126 Personnel; Battery C 131 Personnel;  Sv Battery Auerbach 38 Personnel; Medical Det Auerbach 12 Personnel.  Total 552 Personnel

 

 

 

 

6/2/45

 

Auerbach Germany

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Auerbach 115 Personnel; Battery A Auerbach 130 Personnel; Battery B Auerbach 130 Personnel; Battery C 132 Personnel;  Sv Battery Auerbach 39 Personnel; Medical Det Auerbach 12 Personnel.  Total 558 Personnel

 

 

 

 

6/9/45

 

Auerbach Germany

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Auerbach 115 Personnel; Battery A Auerbach 131 Personnel; Battery B Auerbach 128 Personnel; Battery C 132 Personnel;  Sv Battery Auerbach 38 Personnel; Medical Det Auerbach 12 Personnel.  Total 556 Personnel

 

 

 

 

6/16/45

 

Auerbach Germany

267th FAB Situation Report: HQ&HQ Battery Auerbach 115 Personnel; Battery A Auerbach 131 Personnel; Battery B Auerbach 127 Personnel; Battery C 132 Personnel;  Sv Battery Auerbach 39 Personnel; Medical Det Auerbach 12 Personnel.  Total 556 Personnel

 

 

 

 

6/21/45

 

 

Awarded Bronze Service Star for Rhineland Campaign

 

 

 

 

6/22/45

 

 

Awarded Bronze Service Star for Ardennes Campaign, Awarded Bronze Service Star for Central Europe Campaign

 

 

 

 

6/28/45

 

 

Articles of War Training

 

 

 

 

7/28/45

 

 

Vaccination

 

 

 

 

8/1/45

 

Auerbach Germany

Scheduled to South West Pacific Area under shipment #R4085-HH

 

 

 

 

2/11/46

 

 

267th FAB arrives in US

 

 

 

 

2/12/46

 

Camp Kilmer NJ

267th FAB is inactivated.  AUTHORIZED BATTLE STREAMERS include: Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace and Central Europe.  In the ETO, the Battalion had two men wounded and none killed.  Three officers received the Air Medal.  Four officers and forty-eight enlisted men received Bronze Star Medals, and two enlisted men received Purple Heart Medals.  

 

 

 

 

1/31/49

 

 

The 267th FAB is redesignated as the 971st Field Artillery Battalion and allotted to the Organized Reserve Corps.

 

 

 

 

3/7/55

 

Fort Sill OK

267th Armored Field Artillery Battalion was activated at Fort Sill OK and replaced the 200 Armored Field Artillery Battalion which was returned to National Guard status.  It was armed with 155mm self-propelled Howitzers. 

 

 

 

 

3/27/56

4/12/56

 

The 267th departed Fort Sill to replace the 597th Armored Field Artillery Battalion at Hanau Germany.  It traveled to the Brooklyn Army Terminal then sailed from NY City to Bremehaven Germany.  Then it traveled overland to its duty station in Babenhausen Germany.  This was part of Operation Gyroscope.  It had 31 Officers, 3 Warrant Officers and 645 Enlisted Personnel.

 

 

 

  

4/13/56

 

Babenhausen Germany

The 267th was attached to the Seventh Army, V Corps, 36th Field Artillery Group while stationed in Babenhausen.  

 

 

 

 

5/25/57

 

Grafenwohr Germany

Two servicemen from Battery A were killed and another wounded when there was a malfunction or explosion of a howitzer breech block.

 

 

 

 

10/2/57

 

 

The 267th was designated by the Seventh Army as a Superior Unit for the training year ending 6/30/1957. 

 

 

 

 

12/1/57

 

 

The 267th was inactivated in Germany when it was replaced by the 288th Armored Field Artillery Battalion.

 

 

 

 

12/1/57

Present

 

The 267th FAB remains inactive.